Wednesday, February 23, 2005

Twixsters?!?!?

"Grow Up? Not So Fast"
Time Magazine cover article: Jan. 24, 2005
by Lev Grossman


"The years from 18 until 25 and even beyond have become a distinct and separate life stage, a strange, transitional never-never land between adolescence and adulthood in which people stall for a few extra years, putting off the iron cage of adult responsibility that constantly threatens to crash down on them. They're betwixt and between. You could call them twixters...."

Do you know this group? Do they come to your events? How would you market to them?

3 Comments:

Blogger Peter Jentzsch said...

It occurs to me that there is a lot of talk about involving the audience in their experiences with the arts - and this especially goes for the generation in question. Pure entertainment or esthetics are not enough. They are too used to some form of interactivity through the Internet, computer games etc.

In my recent experience there are two ways of attracting a young audience who are searching for activities through which they can build up their identity....
1) A dancer and choreographer in Copenhagen, Denmark called Kitt Johnson offers classes based on the principles of her own basic training and the sources of her artistic production (German Expressionism and Japanese Butoh). By giving this segment of the young audience access to close contact to herself, the choreographer builds up a loyal group of ambassadors who always come to her performances - and act as ambassadors as well.
2) Recently a young artist named Signa Sorensen installed 57 beds (which was also the name of her performance) in a large performance space. Each bed had a character attached to it. The audience would walk between the beds and interact with the characters. Each performance was obviously very different as the plot changed according to what audience was there. The performance was a huge succes especially among young women aged 21 - 35.

In short, what we need more if is interactivity.

7:58 AM  
Blogger Trevor O'Donnell said...

The number one question on these folks' minds is, "What's in it for me?"

Traditional arts marketing almost never answers that question because our core audiences haven't been asking it. Core audiences already know what's in it for them and arts marketers have developed a convenient shorthand for communicating with them.

Younger audiences don't understand this shorthand. They don't already know what's in it for them so we have to tell them in direct, specific, persuasive ways. And we have to stop using insider language and stereotypical images that scare them off.

I appreciate perije's comments but most traditional artforms can't change the product to make it more marketable. We have to change the marketing to make the product more attractive.

5:30 PM  
Blogger soulchildannie said...

At age 23, I am part of this "Twixters" group. I identify with the harsh truth of this candy label. You can develope a marketing strategy that treats us as intellegent adults. No cliche abtidote is necessary to lure this group to events. Inspire us, give us options, the choice, the opportunity, the control and freedom to enjoy the purity of art. We want high quality and originality. In a world where we are confronted by daily strife and injustice we need escape. So don't just market an event, inspire an idea that impacts the human condition.

12:22 PM  

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